Europe Just Screwed over Android (And You, Too) – Member Feature Stories – Medium

Source: Europe Just Screwed over Android (And You, Too) – Member Feature Stories – Medium

Like Microsoft, Google became a victim of its own success. Chrome controls 66 percent of browser shareand Google dominates 90 percent of all search. Unlike Microsoft back then, Google alreadycontrols the majority of the market, and it’s unlikely that the EU’s antitrust action will do much at all: People want those tools and have come to rely on them.

Targeting Google, killing bundling, and focusing on “competition” on the Android platform misses the entire point: both Search and Chrome are already far too big to fail. This ruling will only end up hurting consumers, moving the profit onto someone else’s bottom line, and pushing more people into Apple’s smartphone monopoly.

And here they go again: Policy makers who don’t understand the underpinnings of the regulations they pass, much less their consequences and ultimately hurting only one party: The consumer. It was about time that politicians and public policy makers got up to par with economy in that they have to know your job before they get to do it…

Advertisements

Welcome to the Gutenberg Editor

(This article was not

Of Mountains & Printing Presses

The goal of this new editor is to make adding rich content to WordPress simple and enjoyable. This whole post is composed of pieces of content—somewhat similar to LEGO bricks—that you can move around and interact with. Move your cursor around and you’ll notice the different blocks light up with outlines and arrows. Press the arrows to reposition blocks quickly, without fearing about losing things in the process of copying and pasting.

What you are reading now is a text block the most basic block of all. The text block has its own controls to be moved freely around the post…

… like this one, which is right aligned.

Headings are separate blocks as well, which helps with the outline and organization of your content.

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Handling images and media with the utmost care is a primary focus of the new editor. Hopefully, you’ll find aspects of adding captions or going full-width with your pictures much easier and robust than before.

Beautiful landscape
If your theme supports it, you’ll see the “wide” button on the image toolbar. Give it a try.

Try selecting and removing or editing the caption, now you don’t have to be careful about selecting the image or other text by mistake and ruining the presentation.

The Inserter Tool

Imagine everything that WordPress can do is available to you quickly and in the same place on the interface. No need to figure out HTML tags, classes, or remember complicated shortcode syntax. That’s the spirit behind the inserter—the (+) button you’ll see around the editor—which allows you to browse all available content blocks and add them into your post. Plugins and themes are able to register their own, opening up all sort of possibilities for rich editing and publishing.

Go give it a try, you may discover things WordPress can already add into your posts that you didn’t know about. Here’s a short list of what you can currently find there:

  • Text & Headings
  • Images & Videos
  • Galleries
  • Embeds, like YouTube, Tweets, or other WordPress posts.
  • Layout blocks, like Buttons, Hero Images, Separators, etc.
  • And Lists like this one of course 🙂

Visual Editing

A huge benefit of blocks is that you can edit them in place and manipulate your content directly. Instead of having fields for editing things like the source of a quote, or the text of a button, you can directly change the content. Try editing the following quote:

The editor will endeavor to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has “blocks” to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or “mystery meat” embed discovery.

Matt Mullenweg, 2017

The information corresponding to the source of the quote is a separate text field, similar to captions under images, so the structure of the quote is protected even if you select, modify, or remove the source. It’s always easy to add it back.

Blocks can be anything you need. For instance, you may want to add a subdued quote as part of the composition of your text, or you may prefer to display a giant stylized one. All of these options are available in the inserter.

You can change the amount of columns in your galleries by dragging a slider in the block inspector in the sidebar.

Media Rich

If you combine the new wide and full-wide alignments with galleries, you can create a very media rich layout, very quickly:

Accessibility is important — don’t forget image alt attribute

Sure, the full-wide image can be pretty big. But sometimes the image is worth it.

The above is a gallery with just two images. It’s an easier way to create visually appealing layouts, without having to deal with floats. You can also easily convert the gallery back to individual images again, by using the block switcher.

Any block can opt into these alignments. The embed block has them also, and is responsive out of the box:

You can build any block you like, static or dynamic, decorative or plain. Here’s a pullquote block:

Code is Poetry

The WordPress community

If you want to learn more about how to build additional blocks, or if you are interested in helping with the project, head over to the GitHub repository.


Thanks for testing Gutenberg!

👋

f.lux: software to make your life better

Interesting! Found this nifty little piece of software today that filters most of the blue light from your computer’s screen according to daytime, thus simulating the natural lighting conditions and being less offensive to your brain’s melatonin production. Apparently, latest research yields strong evidence for impaired sleep in people using tablets, smartphones and computers screens later at night or right before falling asleep. More specifically: The blue light emitted from many of nowaday’s commodity devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops is responsible for altering the body’s circadian clock, which regulates sleep and waking time patterns. Study results indicate that it is particularly the high percentage of blue light coming from those screens that has the body “think” it was looking into the sun at mid day. In using such a device in the hours before falling asleep – which is most likely true for a lot of people working from home or needing to check their inbox one last time before going to bed – we literally seem to “program” our bodies into staying alert at a time, when the body is meant to wind down and get ready for sleep. (I know, I’m guilty as charged in that regard….). F.lux – I love the clever naming, b.t.w.! – is a little piece of software – temporarily, non-destructively – manipulating the color profile of your computer screen in such a way that most of the blue light is filtered away according to daytime and geo location.

I’ve become aware of this software and the science behind it today and immediately headed over to test drive it. Even upon first use I think I can say that I find the mellow warm light when working on the computer later at night a lot less aggressive and offensive to the eyes than the computer display’s regular blend of colors (unless it’s daytime, of course). I switched off F.lux for a moment to see the difference and it’s really an almost “tangible” one. Anyway, if you’re a person aware of your health and caring about it, you might want to try this thing (free of charge, at least for now). Follow the link below to download it for your computer.

f.lux: software to make your life better.

Leistungsschutzrecht: Verlage erteilen Google Recht auf Gratisnutzung – SPIEGEL ONLINE | copyblock.|

Google

Leistungsschutzrecht: Verlage erteilen Google Recht auf Gratisnutzung – SPIEGEL ONLINE.

Schätze mal, das wird Signalwirkung im Hinblick auf den Streit zwischen GEMA und YouTube/Google haben… – nicht zum Nutzen der Künstler natürlich. “Wer zahlt, schafft an”, hieß es auch früher schon immer… Tja. Die Zeiten ändern sich eben doch nicht wirklich….

Google Search in Safari redirects to Bing after SW Install | copyblock.|

There is a pretty annoying issue that can happen after installing freebie software from some providers (we’re not naming names now). Sometimes, the installers of those freebies add something called “Genieo” and it circumvents your choice of search engine in Safari (or your preferred web browser). Apple’s Discussion forum offers a few solutions for this nuisance, however I believe there can be a fairly quick and painless fix so this. This is what I found to be working for me:

I noticed that search terms get redirected to http://search.strtpoint.com before they get further redirected to bing.com When you enter http://search.strtpoint.com in Safari’s address bar and hit return or enter, you’ll land on a simple search page that looks like this:

search redirect page and uninstall

From the text links below, click “Remove InstallMac”, the one I circled red. It will first download a disk image with an uninstaller. Find the uninstaller image in your Downloads folder, mount it using DiskUtility or by simply double-clicking it, then run the uninstaller. There are a couple more instructions, such as resetting Safari’s preferences, i.e. not opening on bing.com as a homepage and if you got “Omnibar” Extension installed and activated, also make sure you reset the search engine being used to “default” instead of “Genieo”. In my case, following the above procedure did it without needing to locate “hidden” directories and removing files using the command line tool, let alone back up and reinstall the system and such things.

Hope, this helps someone save some time and sanity….

MacOS X Yosemite and high WindowServer CPU usage – Nitai

accessibility on yosemite

Here’s a “life saver” article on how to fix the high window server usage on Macs after installing Mac OS X 10.10 “Yosemite”. The trick is to find the transparency setting in the general preferences and turn it all the way down:

MacOS X Yosemite and high WindowServer CPU usage – Nitai.

By default the “Reduce transparency” checkbox is not checked, which results in the “Window Server” process to max out CPU usage – clearly poor engineering as it means that the Mac OS X graphic user interface hogs as much CPU power as it can get, thus effectively rendering the machine unusable to the point, where you might want to ditch Yosemite. What that tells those users who depend on the accessibility settings – I leave that to your own reasoning…. Here’s to hoping that Apple will address the issue in an update – and that this update lands asap. After you’ve followed the instructions in the article, your Mac will return to being a  usable machine.

(Thanks to Dietmar Liehr in that case, who brought this article to my attention as I was indeed in the process of running a full backup, wiping out disk contents  and going back to Maverick…)

Everything Is Broken — The Message — Medium

So yes, the geeks and the executives and the agents and the military have fucked the world. But in the end, it’s the job of the people, working together, to unfuck it.

via Everything Is Broken — The Message — Medium.

Aw man – the most clever “blurb” of writing I’ve come across in a loooong time!!

My 2 cents and paraphrase of above would be:

Most of what’s been dubbed “conspiracy theories” is the combined effects of bad engineering and people exploiting those weaknesses in the technological realm in order to save their own butts. As a person, who has been working in the IT/C industry for 25 years myself in varying positions and having a thorough enough in-depth look into things to understand how they work – or don’t, more often than not – I can attest to everything the article says. You can’t even call out companies on the bullshit they produce, because it would violate their “trade secrets” and other fancy words invented to thinly disguise blatant ignorance married to insane schedules and deadlines (programmers/engineers often love their work, but never get the resources needed to come up with reliable, dependable solutions to any given task.) The headline “Everything Is Broken” is not an exaggeration at all, telling from my own experiences.

What separates me a little from mere conspiracy thinking is the experience that things aren’t meant to be this way from the get-go, at least not in the industries I have been a part of. But one thing leads to another, one jerk finds the next – bigger – jerk and a snowballing effect sets in. Everything may be broken – but it doesn’t have to remain broken. Where do we start? With each and everyone of us, constantly questioning our choices as to whether or not they make good sense, are meaningful and whether or not they harm the environment or other people. It starts with your daily cuppa Joe and goes on to what you’re wearing. In the world of computers: Downsizing and keeping distractions and gadgets at a minimum. I’m not anti-progress all of a sudden. But it should be progress that’s in the best interest of the consumers, not in the interest of corporations. We have to get them back to where they started, which is: Make their utmost effort to serve US, not themselves!